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Visiting Chimayo, NM

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Only 30 minutes north of Santa Fe, on the High Road to Taos, lies a small Spanish village called Chimayo.  With a population of less than 3,000, Chimayo is well known for several reasons.

Perhaps the villages most common claim-to-fame is the Santuario de Chimayo (http://www.elsantuariodechimayo.org).  The quaint adobe structure was built in the mid 1800’s on what is believed to be sacred ground.  There are many miraculous stories associated with the specific location.  Each year during Holy Week, thousands of people make a pilgrimage to the Santuario.  Many believe the small pit of Holy Dirt holds healing and restorative powers.  As a visitor, you can bring a container to take some home with you.  As you walk through the church, pass the altar, you’ll notice a small room filled with devotional artwork and the walking sticks and crutches of those who claim to have been healed.

Chimayo is revered for it’s high quality weavings and traditional Hispanic and Tewa Indian artwork.    Be sure to visit Ortega’s Weaving Shop (http://www.ortegasweaving.com) and Centinela Traditional Arts (http://www.chimayoweavers.com) for the finest examples of local crafts.  In addition to weavings,  you will find intricate tin work, retablos (paintings of saints on flat wooden slabs), bultos (large wooden sculptures), and pottery.

There are also a few small museums in Chimayo, which expound upon the history of the area.  The Chimayo Museum is located in the ancestral home of the Ortega family.  The collection includes furniture, clothing, and tools from the past, highlighting the area’s rich history of farming and craftwork.    The newly opened Bernardo Abeyta Museum offers a thorough account of the man who founded the Santaurio de Chimayo and of the villagers in that era.

If you find yourself craving some traditional Northern New Mexican cuisine, be sure to stop into the famous Rancho de Chimayo (http://www.ranchodechimayo.com).  Utilizing the spiciness of red and green chile, the restaurant offers up the best of the area’s native cooking.

While Chimayo may only be the first stop of many on your way to Taos, it is arguably one the most memorable.  Be sure you make the time to take in this historic villages charm.


Santa Fe Farmer’s Market Offers Locally Grown & Produced Items Year-Round

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Action Packed Farmer's Market in Santa Fe

The Santa Fe Farmer’s Market in central Santa Fe, is a bustling, high-energy market. With over 150 active vendors and hundreds of different agricultural products, this farmer’s market is the largest in New Mexico. Though the market has been in operation since the late 1960′s, with only a handful of producers, in 2002, the market moved to being open year-round.
The diversity of produce is highlighted by the fact that everything that is sold is produced by the vendors and comes from Northern New Mexico.

The Santa Fe Farmer’s Market is great for a quick outing to pick up some local produce, or to spend a half-day shopping, talking to the vendors about their crafts, and having a bite at the Farmer’s Market Cafe where they feature a “bottomless” cups of certified organic Red Rock Roasters coffee!

The location is central to many of the most treasured highlight in central Santa Fe, including the Santa Fe Railyard Park.

The market is open on Saturdays year-round as well as other days of the week depending on the time of year.
Hours:
Saturdays (Year-round!)
Fall/Winter hours: 8am-1pm (Summer hours: 7am-Noon), at the Santa Fe Farmers Market’s permanent home in the Railyard, 1607 Paseo de Peralta (at S. Guadalupe St).
Tuesday Mornings May through November
8am to 1pm, at the Santa Fe Farmers Market’s permanent home in the Railyard, 1607 Paseo de Peralta (at S. Guadalupe St).
Tuesday Afternoons – June through September
3pm to 6pm
Southside Market new location: San Isidro Plaza – Zafarano Dr and Cerrillos Rd

 


Santa Fe Farmer’s Market Offers Locally Grown & Produced Items Year-Round

S

Action Packed Farmer’s Market in Santa Fe

The Santa Fe Farmer’s Market in central Santa Fe, is a bustling, high-energy market. With over 150 active vendors and hundreds of different agricultural products, this farmer’s market is the largest in New Mexico. Though the market has been in operation since the late 1960′s, with only a handful of producers, in 2002, the market moved to being open year-round.
The diversity of produce is highlighted by the fact that everything that is sold is produced by the vendors and comes from Northern New Mexico.

The Santa Fe Farmer’s Market is great for a quick outing to pick up some local produce, or to spend a half-day shopping, talking to the vendors about their crafts, and having a bite at theFarmer’s Market Cafe where they feature a “bottomless” cups of certified organic Red Rock Roasters coffee!

The location is central to many of the most treasured highlight in central Santa Fe, including the Santa Fe Railyard Park.

The market is open on Saturdays year-round as well as other days of the week depending on the time of year.
Hours:
Saturdays (Year-round!)
Fall/Winter hours: 8am-1pm (Summer hours: 7am-Noon), at the Santa Fe Farmers Market’s permanent home in the Railyard, 1607 Paseo de Peralta (at S. Guadalupe St).
Tuesday Mornings May through November
8am to 1pm, at the Santa Fe Farmers Market’s permanent home in the Railyard, 1607 Paseo de Peralta (at S. Guadalupe St).
Tuesday Afternoons – June through September
3pm to 6pm
Southside Market new location: San Isidro Plaza – Zafarano Dr and Cerrillos Rd


Santa Fe Restaurant Updates

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Santa Fe is not only known for art and culture, but also for fine dining and a diverse range of cuisine.  Santa Fe Restaurant Week is March 4th – 11th, 2012 (santafe.restaurantweeknm.com) and will have more than 60 participants.  In addition to the popular tourist spots, there will also be several new restaurants and local favorites included.  Be sure to experience some of these eateries on your next Santa Fe culinary adventure!

 

New Restaurants

Azur : Mediterranean (azursantafe.com)  Features small plates and full entrees from the regions surrounding the Mediterranee.  Highlights include the Plum Lamb Tagine, Truffled Creamy Risotto, and Sardine Rilletes.

Junction : Casual American (junctionsantafe.com)  Located near the Santa Fe Farmer’s Market, Junction features locally grown ingredients in it’s creative American fare.  Be sure to try the Ahi Tuna Tacos.

The Palace Restaurant and Saloon : New American/Italian (www.palacesantafe.com)  Newly restored and reopened classic Santa Fe restaurant.  Menu ranges from innovative Italian dishes to classic American comfort food.  Try the Pasta Carbonara, Beet and Pumpkin Risotto, and Mustard Crusted Grouper.

Raaga : Indian (raagacuisine.com)  Focusing on traditional Northern Indian cuisine with an added Southwest flavor.  The extensive menu includes several vegetarian and vegan options as well.  Highlights from include the Ancho Amchur Crusted Tandoori Chicken, Surmal Kofta, and Zaffrani Machi.

San Q Sushi and Tapas : Japanese (sanqrestaurant.com)  Located in the historic Burro Alley, where the atomic bomb was briefly parked before being deployed to Hiroshima.  Try the wide range of Japanese tapas, fire steaks and sake bombs.

Tomme : French (tommesf.com)  An intimate modern bistro featuring a select French inspired menu.  Don’t miss the Steak Frites or Moules Mariniere.

 

Local Favorites

Jambo Café : African (jambocafe.net)  Winner of the Souper Bowl three years in a row, this popular spot offers homestyle African cuisine.  Try the award-winning Goat Stew, Grilled Mahi Mahi, or Moroccan Chicken Kabobs.

Joe’s Diner : American (www.joessantafe.com)  Joe’s mission is to support local farmers and bring the freshest ingredients to your table.  Their menu features homemade smoked meats, desserts and oven-baked pizzas in addition to their salads, sandwiches and soups.

Mu Du Noodles : Asian (mudunoodles.com)  A nutritious and sustainable Asian restaurant located just outside of downtown.  Favorite dishes include the spicy Yaki Udon, Lemongrass Soup, and Malaysian Laksa.

Plaza Café Southside : New Mexican (www.plazacafesouth.com)  While the famous downtown Plaza Café undergoes renovations, make your way to the Southside location that features New Mexican comfort food and homemade desserts at their best!  Leave room for the Red Velvet Flan!

Santa Fe Capitol Grill : American (sfcapitolgrill.com)  Modern décor, elegance and fresh seasonal ingredients are the Capitol Grill’s specialties.  Highlights include the Quinoa Stuffed Acorn Squash, Sweet Chili Calamari, and Green Chile Fettuccini Alfredo.

Tune-Up Café : Central American (tuneupcafe.com)  El Salvadoran influenced cuisine with festive casual outdoor dining.  Try the El Salvadoran Combo with a banana leaf wrapped tamale, pupusa, rice, and curtido.

 


Santa Fe Restaurant Updates

S

Santa Fe is not only known for art and culture, but also for fine dining and a diverse range of cuisine.  Santa Fe Restaurant Week is March 4th – 11th, 2012 (santafe.restaurantweeknm.com) and will have more than 60 participants.  In addition to the popular tourist spots, there will also be several new restaurants and local favorites included.  Be sure to experience some of these eateries on your next Santa Fe culinary adventure!

 

New Restaurants

Azur : Mediterranean (azursantafe.com)  Features small plates and full entrees from the regions surrounding the Mediterranee.  Highlights include the Plum Lamb Tagine, Truffled Creamy Risotto, and Sardine Rilletes.

Junction : Casual American (junctionsantafe.com)  Located near the Santa Fe Farmer’s Market, Junction features locally grown ingredients in it’s creative American fare.  Be sure to try the Ahi Tuna Tacos.

The Palace Restaurant and Saloon : New American/Italian (www.palacesantafe.com)  Newly restored and reopened classic Santa Fe restaurant.  Menu ranges from innovative Italian dishes to classic American comfort food.  Try the Pasta Carbonara, Beet and Pumpkin Risotto, and Mustard Crusted Grouper.

Raaga : Indian (raagacuisine.com)  Focusing on traditional Northern Indian cuisine with an added Southwest flavor.  The extensive menu includes several vegetarian and vegan options as well.  Highlights from include the Ancho Amchur Crusted Tandoori Chicken, Surmal Kofta, and Zaffrani Machi.

San Q Sushi and Tapas : Japanese (sanqrestaurant.com)  Located in the historic Burro Alley, where the atomic bomb was briefly parked before being deployed to Hiroshima.  Try the wide range of Japanese tapas, fire steaks and sake bombs.

Tomme : French (tommesf.com)  An intimate modern bistro featuring a select French inspired menu.  Don’t miss the Steak Frites or Moules Mariniere.

 

Local Favorites

Jambo Café : African (jambocafe.net)  Winner of the Souper Bowl three years in a row, this popular spot offers homestyle African cuisine.  Try the award-winning Goat Stew, Grilled Mahi Mahi, or Moroccan Chicken Kabobs.

Joe’s Diner : American (www.joessantafe.com)  Joe’s mission is to support local farmers and bring the freshest ingredients to your table.  Their menu features homemade smoked meats, desserts and oven-baked pizzas in addition to their salads, sandwiches and soups.

Mu Du Noodles : Asian (mudunoodles.com)  A nutritious and sustainable Asian restaurant located just outside of downtown.  Favorite dishes include the spicy Yaki Udon, Lemongrass Soup, and Malaysian Laksa.

Plaza Café Southside : New Mexican (www.plazacafesouth.com)  While the famous downtown Plaza Café undergoes renovations, make your way to the Southside location that features New Mexican comfort food and homemade desserts at their best!  Leave room for the Red Velvet Flan!

Santa Fe Capitol Grill : American (sfcapitolgrill.com)  Modern décor, elegance and fresh seasonal ingredients are the Capitol Grill’s specialties.  Highlights include the Quinoa Stuffed Acorn Squash, Sweet Chili Calamari, and Green Chile Fettuccini Alfredo.

Tune-Up Café : Central American (tuneupcafe.com)  El Salvadoran influenced cuisine with festive casual outdoor dining.  Try the El Salvadoran Combo with a banana leaf wrapped tamale, pupusa, rice, and curtido.


It’s Time for Skiing in Santa Fe

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After a spectacular colorful fall, the weather has turned cool in Santa Fe.  It’s time to plan your ski vacation.  We have already had several snows on both the Jemez and the Sangre de Cristo Mountains.  The snow making at Ski Santa Fe is in operation.

Just to review,  Ski Santa Fe (www.skisantafe.com  -  505 983-9155) has five chairlifts and two conveyor lifts servicing 74 trails.  Forty percent of the trails are expert, 40% intermediate and 20% beginner.  There is a new black diamond run and the lodge is under expansion.  Average annual snowfall is 225 inches with snowmaking on 50% of the mountain.  Ski Santa Fe is a short 16 miles from Santa Fe  (30 to 45 minutes drive).

Also close to Santa Fe is the Pajarito Mountain Ski Area, just 45 miles away (about 1 hour driving).  Here, there are 5 chairlifts and one surface lift servicing 40 trails.  The trail difficulty is the same as for Ski Santa Fe (40/40/20).  This ski area is also accessible to Nordic trails.  Average annual snowfall is 125 inches and there is a 1,200 foot vertical drop.  (www.skipajarito.com – 505 662-5725)

Of course, a little farther away are several additional ski areas including the Taos Ski Valley (two hours drive), Enchanted Forest Cross Country and Snowshoe Area (2 and 1/2 hours drive) and Sipapu Ski Resort (90 minutes drive).

Santa Fe is an excellent base for your ski adventure. After an energetic day on the slopes, you can come home to a relaxing spa, enjoy fine dining, expand your knowledge at one of the fine museums, take in a live concert or just relax in your bed and breakfast room.


It’s Time for Skiing in Santa Fe

I

After a spectacular colorful fall, the weather has turned cool in Santa Fe.  It’s time to plan your ski vacation.  We have already had several snows on both the Jemez and the Sangre de Cristo Mountains.  The snow making at Ski Santa Fe is in operation.

Just to review,  Ski Santa Fe (www.skisantafe.com  -  505 983-9155) has five chairlifts and two conveyor lifts servicing 74 trails.  Forty percent of the trails are expert, 40% intermediate and 20% beginner.  There is a new black diamond run and the lodge is under expansion.  Average annual snowfall is 225 inches with snowmaking on 50% of the mountain.  Ski Santa Fe is a short 16 miles from Santa Fe  (30 to 45 minutes drive).

Also close to Santa Fe is the Pajarito Mountain Ski Area, just 45 miles away (about 1 hour driving).  Here, there are 5 chairlifts and one surface lift servicing 40 trails.  The trail difficulty is the same as for Ski Santa Fe (40/40/20).  This ski area is also accessible to Nordic trails.  Average annual snowfall is 125 inches and there is a 1,200 foot vertical drop.  (www.skipajarito.com – 505 662-5725)

Of course, a little farther away are several additional ski areas including the Taos Ski Valley (two hours drive), Enchanted Forest Cross Country and Snowshoe Area (2 and 1/2 hours drive) and Sipapu Ski Resort (90 minutes drive).

Santa Fe is an excellent base for your ski adventure. After an energetic day on the slopes, you can come home to a relaxing spa, enjoy fine dining, expand your knowledge at one of the fine museums, take in a live concert or just relax in your bed and breakfast room.


Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument

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Here’s a wonderful hiking area a short drive south from Santa Fe.  Hiking to the top of a mesa on one of the trails reveals a staggering view, unlike anything else in the area.  Huge teepee-shaped rocks, formed by the erosion of volcanic ash tower over the valley like skyscrapers.  Over the years, hard boulders protected the soft ash and, as the wind and rain eroded the landscape, the gigantic “tents” emerged.  You can hike through the narrow canyons in amongst the towers on a short trail or hike up to the top on a longer trail yielding grand vistas.


Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument

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Here’s a wonderful hiking area a short drive south from Santa Fe.  Hiking to the top of a mesa on one of the trails reveals a staggering view, unlike anything else in the area.  Huge teepee-shaped rocks, formed by the erosion of volcanic ash tower over the valley like skyscrapers.  Over the years, hard boulders protected the soft ash and, as the wind and rain eroded the landscape, the gigantic “tents” emerged.  You can hike through the narrow canyons in amongst the towers on a short trail or hike up to the top on a longer trail yielding grand vistas.


Did You Know?

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New Mexico was home to Ernest Thompson Seton, co-founder of the Boy Scouts of America and father of the modern environmental movement. Seton was also the most important and technically accomplished wildlife illustrator since Audubon. The New Mexico History Museum has an exhibit “Wild at Heart” dealing with the life and works of this important New Mexico resident, showing now through May 5, 2011.