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Visiting Chimayo, NM

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Only 30 minutes north of Santa Fe, on the High Road to Taos, lies a small Spanish village called Chimayo.  With a population of less than 3,000, Chimayo is well known for several reasons.

Perhaps the villages most common claim-to-fame is the Santuario de Chimayo (http://www.elsantuariodechimayo.org).  The quaint adobe structure was built in the mid 1800’s on what is believed to be sacred ground.  There are many miraculous stories associated with the specific location.  Each year during Holy Week, thousands of people make a pilgrimage to the Santuario.  Many believe the small pit of Holy Dirt holds healing and restorative powers.  As a visitor, you can bring a container to take some home with you.  As you walk through the church, pass the altar, you’ll notice a small room filled with devotional artwork and the walking sticks and crutches of those who claim to have been healed.

Chimayo is revered for it’s high quality weavings and traditional Hispanic and Tewa Indian artwork.    Be sure to visit Ortega’s Weaving Shop (http://www.ortegasweaving.com) and Centinela Traditional Arts (http://www.chimayoweavers.com) for the finest examples of local crafts.  In addition to weavings,  you will find intricate tin work, retablos (paintings of saints on flat wooden slabs), bultos (large wooden sculptures), and pottery.

There are also a few small museums in Chimayo, which expound upon the history of the area.  The Chimayo Museum is located in the ancestral home of the Ortega family.  The collection includes furniture, clothing, and tools from the past, highlighting the area’s rich history of farming and craftwork.    The newly opened Bernardo Abeyta Museum offers a thorough account of the man who founded the Santaurio de Chimayo and of the villagers in that era.

If you find yourself craving some traditional Northern New Mexican cuisine, be sure to stop into the famous Rancho de Chimayo (http://www.ranchodechimayo.com).  Utilizing the spiciness of red and green chile, the restaurant offers up the best of the area’s native cooking.

While Chimayo may only be the first stop of many on your way to Taos, it is arguably one the most memorable.  Be sure you make the time to take in this historic villages charm.

 


Visiting Chimayo, NM

V

Only 30 minutes north of Santa Fe, on the High Road to Taos, lies a small Spanish village called Chimayo.  With a population of less than 3,000, Chimayo is well known for several reasons.

Perhaps the villages most common claim-to-fame is the Santuario de Chimayo (http://www.elsantuariodechimayo.org).  The quaint adobe structure was built in the mid 1800’s on what is believed to be sacred ground.  There are many miraculous stories associated with the specific location.  Each year during Holy Week, thousands of people make a pilgrimage to the Santuario.  Many believe the small pit of Holy Dirt holds healing and restorative powers.  As a visitor, you can bring a container to take some home with you.  As you walk through the church, pass the altar, you’ll notice a small room filled with devotional artwork and the walking sticks and crutches of those who claim to have been healed.

Chimayo is revered for it’s high quality weavings and traditional Hispanic and Tewa Indian artwork.    Be sure to visit Ortega’s Weaving Shop (http://www.ortegasweaving.com) and Centinela Traditional Arts (http://www.chimayoweavers.com) for the finest examples of local crafts.  In addition to weavings,  you will find intricate tin work, retablos (paintings of saints on flat wooden slabs), bultos (large wooden sculptures), and pottery.

There are also a few small museums in Chimayo, which expound upon the history of the area.  The Chimayo Museum is located in the ancestral home of the Ortega family.  The collection includes furniture, clothing, and tools from the past, highlighting the area’s rich history of farming and craftwork.    The newly opened Bernardo Abeyta Museum offers a thorough account of the man who founded the Santaurio de Chimayo and of the villagers in that era.

If you find yourself craving some traditional Northern New Mexican cuisine, be sure to stop into the famous Rancho de Chimayo (http://www.ranchodechimayo.com).  Utilizing the spiciness of red and green chile, the restaurant offers up the best of the area’s native cooking.

While Chimayo may only be the first stop of many on your way to Taos, it is arguably one the most memorable.  Be sure you make the time to take in this historic villages charm.


Santa Fe Farmer’s Market Offers Locally Grown & Produced Items Year-Round

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Action Packed Farmer's Market in Santa Fe

The Santa Fe Farmer’s Market in central Santa Fe, is a bustling, high-energy market. With over 150 active vendors and hundreds of different agricultural products, this farmer’s market is the largest in New Mexico. Though the market has been in operation since the late 1960’s, with only a handful of producers, in 2002, the market moved to being open year-round.
The diversity of produce is highlighted by the fact that everything that is sold is produced by the vendors and comes from Northern New Mexico.

The Santa Fe Farmer’s Market is great for a quick outing to pick up some local produce, or to spend a half-day shopping, talking to the vendors about their crafts, and having a bite at the Farmer’s Market Cafe where they feature a “bottomless” cups of certified organic Red Rock Roasters coffee!

The location is central to many of the most treasured highlight in central Santa Fe, including the Santa Fe Railyard Park.

The market is open on Saturdays year-round as well as other days of the week depending on the time of year.
Hours:
Saturdays (Year-round!)
Fall/Winter hours: 8am-1pm (Summer hours: 7am-Noon), at the Santa Fe Farmers Market’s permanent home in the Railyard, 1607 Paseo de Peralta (at S. Guadalupe St).
Tuesday Mornings May through November
8am to 1pm, at the Santa Fe Farmers Market’s permanent home in the Railyard, 1607 Paseo de Peralta (at S. Guadalupe St).
Tuesday Afternoons – June through September
3pm to 6pm
Southside Market new location: San Isidro Plaza – Zafarano Dr and Cerrillos Rd

 


Santa Fe Farmer’s Market Offers Locally Grown & Produced Items Year-Round

S

Action Packed Farmer’s Market in Santa Fe

The Santa Fe Farmer’s Market in central Santa Fe, is a bustling, high-energy market. With over 150 active vendors and hundreds of different agricultural products, this farmer’s market is the largest in New Mexico. Though the market has been in operation since the late 1960′s, with only a handful of producers, in 2002, the market moved to being open year-round.
The diversity of produce is highlighted by the fact that everything that is sold is produced by the vendors and comes from Northern New Mexico.

The Santa Fe Farmer’s Market is great for a quick outing to pick up some local produce, or to spend a half-day shopping, talking to the vendors about their crafts, and having a bite at theFarmer’s Market Cafe where they feature a “bottomless” cups of certified organic Red Rock Roasters coffee!

The location is central to many of the most treasured highlight in central Santa Fe, including the Santa Fe Railyard Park.

The market is open on Saturdays year-round as well as other days of the week depending on the time of year.
Hours:
Saturdays (Year-round!)
Fall/Winter hours: 8am-1pm (Summer hours: 7am-Noon), at the Santa Fe Farmers Market’s permanent home in the Railyard, 1607 Paseo de Peralta (at S. Guadalupe St).
Tuesday Mornings May through November
8am to 1pm, at the Santa Fe Farmers Market’s permanent home in the Railyard, 1607 Paseo de Peralta (at S. Guadalupe St).
Tuesday Afternoons – June through September
3pm to 6pm
Southside Market new location: San Isidro Plaza – Zafarano Dr and Cerrillos Rd